Beautiful Iceland

jkottke:

I’ve seen the waterfalls and the hot springs and the rocky desolation, but I didn’t know that Iceland was also this:

Iceland

Iceland

Iceland

I mean, come on. Photos by Max Rive, Menno Schaefer, and Johnathan Esper. Many more here. (via mr)

mj-the-scientist:

mathforlovers:

studygeek:

Without mathematics you wouldn’t have pringles :)

Pringles are my favorite examples of saddle points, i.e. a point that is both a local maximum and minimum.

I think about this a lot.

This is important to me.

mj-the-scientist:

mathforlovers:

studygeek:

Without mathematics you wouldn’t have pringles :)

Pringles are my favorite examples of saddle points, i.e. a point that is both a local maximum and minimum.

I think about this a lot.

This is important to me.

(via nanodash)

John Philipps Emslie

jkottke:

These maps, diagrams, and charts by John Philipps Emslie done in the mid-to-late 1800s are gorgeous.

John Philipps Emslie

Intrigued, I went searching for more examples. I loved this one just for pure compositional beauty:

John Philipps Emslie

And this lithograph from 1850 showing various machines of the time:

John Philipps Emslie

(thx, greg)

When I first looked up, I thought it was floating (by Brother O’Mara)

When I first looked up, I thought it was floating (by Brother O’Mara)

skunkbear:

This is a time lapse built from Hubble Telescope images taken of the star V838 Monocerotis between 2002 and 2006. But it doesn’t show a supernova. Good old V838 didn’t explode. No.
V838 suddenly brightened, and we’re watching that burst of light pass through a relatively stationary cloud of dust, illuminating the cloud as it goes.
The video was originally posted in 2006, and Slate’s Phil Plait has written all about it, but in the mysterious way of the internet, this stellar light eruption has just recently gone viral.
Click through this thumbnail to a beautiful rendering of the event, by Roberto Colombari:

skunkbear:

This is a time lapse built from Hubble Telescope images taken of the star V838 Monocerotis between 2002 and 2006. But it doesn’t show a supernova. Good old V838 didn’t explode. No.

V838 suddenly brightened, and we’re watching that burst of light pass through a relatively stationary cloud of dust, illuminating the cloud as it goes.

The video was originally posted in 2006, and Slate’s Phil Plait has written all about it, but in the mysterious way of the internet, this stellar light eruption has just recently gone viral.

Click through this thumbnail to a beautiful rendering of the event, by Roberto Colombari:

image

NIGHTNIGHT by DEDDY